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Course Description

MATH 1311:  Finite Mathematics for Students of Business

The course begins with a discussion of functions modeling concepts related to cost (fixed and variable), revenue, profit, and supply and demand. The course then proceeds to topics involving interest, future, and present values of an annuity. This includes sinking funds and amortization. The course next covers topics from discrete probability and counting, considering odds and expected value of a random variable. It concludes with a discussion of Markov Chains and their use in making long-term projections. In all cases the emphasis of the course should be on concepts and applications to business and finance. Emphasis on memorization of formula and algorithms should be minimal.

MATH 1312: Calculus for Students of Business

The course begins with a discussion of regression analysis to model real-world phenomena. It proceeds to apply the concept of rate of change to study marginal analysis, elasticity of demand, and management of resources. The course concludes by using integral calculus to study areas as applied to such topics as average value, continuous income flow, coefficient of inequity, and consumer surplus and producer surplus. In all cases the emphasis of the course should be on concepts and applications to business and finance. Emphasis on memorization of formula and algorithms should be minimal.

MATH 1313:  Statistical Methods

The course begins with a discussion of data needs, types, sources, presentation, and analysis. Such analysis includes measures of central tendency, variation, and coefficient of correlation. Basis probability and probability distributions are discussed. These include covariance, and binomial and normal distribution. The course concludes with sampling distribution and confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, regression analysis, and control charts. Emphasis is on the use of statistics to decision making in the managerial context. Emphasis on memorization of formula and algorithms should be minimal.

MATH 1321 Pre-Calculus Mathematics

MATH 1321 covers topics normally assumed to be prerequisite knowledge and skills for calculus, as well as applicable to the field of interior design. These topics include modeling with linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions. A significant portion of the course is devoted to Trigonometry including properties of sine, cosine, and other trigonometric functions. The laws of sines and cosines are covered along with the sum and difference formulas for each. Compositions, inverses, and combinations of functions are also covered. The emphasis is on concepts and applications to physical science, interior design, and engineering, with minimal emphasis on memorization of formula and algorithms.

MATH 1422:  Calculus I

MATH 1422 is a mainstream course in Differential Calculus. It covers both the mechanics of computing derivatives and their applications to problems arising in the physical sciences and engineering. Such topics include limits of functions, concept of differentiation of one variable with rules for differentiation, and applications of derivatives involving related rates, optimization, and curve sketching. In addition the indefinite and definite integral are introduced. In all cases the emphasis of the course is on concepts and applications to physical science and engineering. Emphasis on memorization of formula and algorithms should be minimal.

MATH 1423:  Calculus II

MATH 1423 is the continuation of MATH 1422. It covers both the mechanics of computing integrals and their applications to problems arising in the physical sciences and engineering. Such topics include applications of integration to the computation of areas, volumes, and arc length; as well as work and force. Techniques of integration are also covered. Sequences and comparison tests for series are covered along with power series. In all cases the emphasis of the course should be on concepts and applications to physical science and engineering. Emphasis on memorization of formula and algorithms should be minimal.

MATH 1324:  Calculus III

MATH 1324 is the continuation of MATH 1423 and the culmination of the three-course calculus series. It covers topics from multivariable calculus including vector-valued functions, multiple integration, and vector analysis. Differentiation and integration of vector valued functions are studied with application of ballistics. Techniques and applications of partial differentiation are covered as well as multiple integration with application to surface areas, mass, and moments. The course ends with a discussion of the multiple variable versions of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus: Greens Theorem and Stokes Theorem. In all cases the emphasis of the course should be on concepts and applications to physical science and engineering. Emphasis on memorization of formula and algorithms should be minimal.

MATH 2331: Linear Algebra

MATH 2331 covers topics of matrix algebra and linear spaces. Matrix topics include systems of linear equations, row echelon form, matrix algebra, elementary matrices, determinants, and Cramer’s Rule. Vector space topics include subspaces, linear dependence and independence, basis and dimension, row and column spaces. Linear transformations are discussed in detail including matrix representations and similarity. The course concludes with a discussion of orthogonality and Eigen values and eigenvectors. The major emphasis is on applications to problems from the physical sciences and engineering.

MATH 2332:  Ordinary Differential Equations

MATH 2332 develops the basic methods for solving first order differential equations. These include separation of variables, exact differential equations, and integrating factors. Problems arising from the physical science and engineering involving such equations are modeled and solved. Higher order linear differential equations, both homogeneous and non-homogeneous, are discussed using the methods of undetermined coefficients and variation of parameters. Laplace Transforms are covered in some detail including transformations of derivatives and integrals, unit step functions, and Dirac’s Delta function. Differentiation and integration of transforms are covered along with convolution and integral equations. These are applied to solutions of differential equations and systems of differential equations. MATH 2332 concludes with a brief discussion of Fourier Series approximations to periodic, even, and odd functions. The major emphasis is on modeling and solving problems arising in the physical sciences and engineering.

BIOL 1411: Introductory Biology

Topics covered in this course include cell biology, genetics, physiology, ecology, diversity of living organisms, evolution, interrelationships of structure and function, self regulation, and capture and use of energy. A brief survey of plants and animals will be included, as well as especially physiological aspects of human anatomy and physiology.

CHEM 1411: Introductory Chemistry

Topics covered in this course include a basic introduction to matter and energy and how they are interrelated. Elements, atoms and modern atomic theory will form the base for understanding how chemical components interact through chemical reactions. Students will learn how chemical reactions are described and how they are governed. Finally, the properties of different physical phases of matter (gases, liquids and solids) will be investigated.

CHEM 1421: Chemistry for Engineers I

Topics covered in this course create a base in chemistry that will be subsequently used in CHEM 1422. Beginning with an introduction to chemistry, this course will delve into atomic structure, ions and molecules. Students will learn to quantify chemical reactions, and how reactions occur in gases, liquids and solids. The nature of chemical bonding and the forces controlling it will be considered, as will molecular geometry as it relates to chemical structure. Each topic will build upon the growing base formed by previously learned material.

CHEM 1422: Chemistry for Engineers II

Topics covered in this course build upon the base received in CHEM 1421:  Chemistry for Engineers I, and will begin with a discussion of the tools of chemistry.  As in CHEM 1421, each topic builds upon the growing base formed by previously learned material

GEOL 1411: Introductory Physical Geology

Topics covered in this course include minerals and a brief survey of the types of rocks and how they are produced. The course will consider erosion and how it occurs, the involvement and storage of groundwater, and the unique geology of deserts and shorelines. Plate tectonics and mountain building, as well as earthquakes will be investigated. While world geology will be the focus, emphasis will be placed on Middle Eastern geology where appropriate.

PHYS 1411: Introductory Physics

Topics covered in this course begin with consideration of classic Newtonian mechanics, including energy, work, position, velocity and acceleration. Lectures and labs will then focus on fluids, heat, light and optics, and sound, with an emphasis of practical implications of each of these concepts. Electricity and magnetism and their use in modern society will then be investigated. A brief survey of astronomy will indicate how physical principles apply in the cosmos as well as in our own homes. The course will conclude with a discussion of nuclear physics and energy production.

PHYS 1421: Physics for Engineers I

Topics covered in this course create a base in physics that will be subsequently used in PHYS 1422. Beginning with a discussion of the tools of physics, this course moves on to discuss motion and acceleration, Newton’s Laws of physics, friction and the types of motions and their characteristics. Momentum is investigated, along with the key forces of inertia, torque and angular momentum. The course concludes with consideration of harmonics, waves and sound. As in PHYS 1421: Introductory Physics, each topic builds upon the growing base formed by previously learned material

PHYS 1422: Physics for Engineers II

Topics covered in this course build upon the base received in PHYS 1421, and will begin with electricity (charge, field, potential), capacitors and DC circuits. Magnetism and electromagnetic induction will then be discussed. The course concludes with modern physics, nuclear physics and elementary particles, light and physical optics. As in PHYS 1421, each topic builds upon the growing base formed by previously learned material.